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The FLIR ONE

As many of you may have read on our Blog a few months ago, FLIR showcased a new gadget – a FLIR thermal camera sensor and lens built into a custom iPhone case, thus creating something that had not been seen before: a mobile phone capable of capturing and editing actual thermal imagery.

Unlike many prototypes that made it no further than the concept stage, FLIR has pushed their prototype Thermal Camera iPhone case into consumer production.  The FLIR One, as it’s called, is now available for purchase for less than $350 USD.  Some may think that $350 is a lot to pay for an iPhone case with another camera on it, but compared with it’s closest living relative, the FLIR E4, which is priced at around $1600 AUD, it’s a no-brainer.

Scantherma_FLIR-one_Iphone_5

The new FLIR One iPhone case, sporting a very sleek design, thermal camera and sensor and a built in battery. Very nice!

With the FLIR One, small business owners and enthusiast now have a way to see what’s hot and what’s not without breaking the bank.  But remember, for all the big boys, FLIR has a large range of hand held and fixed thermal cameras that are sure fit your needs.

For more information on the professional thermal imaging solutions Scantherma offers from FLIR please visit our Thermal Camera website here, or drop in to our Perth office for a free consultation.

FLIR 2 for 1 Promo

FLIR Systems Australia have announced some very attractive special offers running through the month of September.

Thermal imaging cameras are increasingly being used by trades people from electricians and building inspectors to HVAC specialists and plumbers to help them do their job faster and better.

FLIR’s ‘2 for 1’ deal for September 2013 offers a free i-Series thermal imaging camera on every FLIR E50 or E60 camera.

 

  • Buy a FLIR E60 thermal imaging camera and get the FLIR i5 at no extra cost.
  • Buy a FLIR E50 thermal imaging camera and get the FLIR i3 at no extra cost.

 

FLIR E series Thermal Cameras

FLIR E series Thermal Cameras

FLIR I series Thermal Cameras

FLIR I series Thermal Cameras

 

For those who don’t need the top-of-the-range E-Series, there is a special deal on the FLIR E30 or E40 value pack that not only comes with many of the features of the E50 and E60 cameras, but also offers excellent value for money along with some very useful accessories at no extra cost including a spare battery, tool belt and pouch.

FLIR’s ‘2 for 1’ offer is only available for the month of September 2013.

Scantherma R&D 2 Images revealed.

If you have not guessed what the Thermal images from our last R&D blog entry were from here it is.

 

Hot water

Boiling water in bowl.

All the thermal images from our previous entry were of this ordinary bowl, or rather what was in it. Boiling hot water.

The patterns were formed in a few ways. The vortex images for instance were caused by moving a small spoon through the water in a horizontal pattern. The wake caused small curly shapes that could only be seen through a thermal camera. Other patterns were formed by mixing the water with the spoon, pouring cold water into the hot water and throwing in some Ice. Mixing a small amount of detergent into the water gave us the final image labelled Pumice in Lava. The images owe their colours to the different Thermal Palettes that were used when post-processing them. The thermal range was also limited in some images to accentuate the hottest or coldest areas in the image.

Scantherma R&D 2

Welcome to the second Scantherma R&D post. As mentioned in our last post, we at Scantherma conduct a fair few experiments to help us gain a better understanding of the technologies that we use for our everyday work. In doing this “R&D” we can come up with better techniques that can ultimately save time and enhance the quality of our process and end product.  Here are the second set of images.

Maelstrom1

R&D Image 1 ( Maelstrom 1 )

Maelstrom3

R&D Image 2 ( Maelstrom 2 )

Maelstrom2

R&D image 3 ( Maelstrom 3 )

Freeze_Ray

R&D image 4 ( Freeze Ray )

Ink_blood1

. R&D Image 5 ( Ink & Blood )

vortex1

R&D Image 6 ( Vortex 1 )

vortex2

R&D Image 7 ( Vortex 2 )

The_Blob

R&D Image 8 ( Volcanic Rock )

pumice_lava

R&D Image 9 ( Pumice in Lave )

That’s all  for the second round of R&D images. It is amazing what one can see through a Thermal Camera. The invisible becomes visible. As before try to guess the subject matter of the above images. The Digital photos will be revealed next week so stay tuned.

 

Scantherma Thermal Imaging Test Images revealed.

In the previous blog entry we saw a set of very interesting thermal images taken from a series of objects during a Scantherma Thermal Imaging test session that more or less represented astronomical phenomenon. Below are digital images showing those same objects.

The Jam Doughnut in Test image 1 was heated for 30 seconds on high in a microwave. It retained its heat for a while and had a core temperature of more than 110 degrees centigrade. That’s enough to give any hungry doughnut lover a seriously burnt tongue. The thermal image was processed in different IR Palettes to produce the images from the last R&D post.

Mug with hot water (Test Image 2) that was then mixed with a spoon to form a maelstrom effect. The thermal image was then processed to show a very narrow range of the highest temperatures thus displaying the the water in a nice purple and cancelling out the much cooler cup.

Boiling water (Test Image 3) was poured into this bowl followed by flakes of ice. The water surface was very hot and the ice extremely cold thus giving the illusion of the Sun with giant sun spots.   There you have it. Some interesting “trickery” with thermal cameras. Stay tuned for our next R&D blog next week with more interesting images.

 

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1: Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1:
Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2: Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2:
Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3: Bowl of hot water ( Sun )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3:
Bowl of hot water ( Sun )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging Test 1

At Scantherma we conduct a lot of research and development and a lot it concerns Thermal Imaging. Below are a set of very interesting images that were taken during our last session of research.

Have in mind that not everything is as it seems so try to guess what the following thermal images are from.

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 1: Asteroid 1

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 1:
Asteroid 1

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 2: Asteroid 2

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 2:
Asteroid 2

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 3: Moon

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 3:
Moon

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 4: Sun spots

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 4:
Sun spots

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 5: Super Nova

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 5:
Super Nova

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 6: Stellar Gas Cloud

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 6:
Stellar Gas Cloud

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 7: Wormhole

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 7:
Wormhole

 

The true identity of these images will be revealed in our next R&D Blog entry. In the meanwhile have a go at guessing what these Thermal Images are showing.

Thermal Imaging Training Course

Scantherma is pleased to announce the availability of the first in a series of training courses aimed at Thermographers.

This first course titled “ Introduction to Thermography” will cover a range of subject matter that will help you understand the science of Infrared and thermal imaging through to using a thermal camera and taking images.

 

Introduction to Thermography

 

The course duration is approximately 5 hours and will have both theory and practical elements.

Full details will be posted in the coming week. So stay tuned.

 

Landsat 8 Sensors

Landsat 8 launched in February will orbit the Earth fourteen times a day, following the same sequence of ground tracks as Landsat 4, 5 and 7. This allows data to be produced in the same WRS-2 path and row grid system, but collecting 150 more scenes per day than Landsat 7. This greatly increases the possibility of obtaining cloud-free satellite imagery. Although it has been built around a design life of 5 years, it was launched with enough fuel to keep it in orbit and operational for over 10 years. The Landsat satellite has 2 main imaging systems on board. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)  and the Operational Land Imager (OLI).

The failure of the Scan-Line Corrector on Landsat 7 has driven the change from a whiskbroom to a pushbroom sensor for the OLI (image 1)on Landsat8. This brings it into line with most other modern satellite systems. Besides this major design change, the other specifications of the OLI are very similar to the Landsat TM and ETM+ sensors.

Imagery will be collected at a resolution of 30m for multispectral data and 15m for panchromatic data with a swath width of 185km. It will include all spectral bands used by Landsat TM and ETM+ along with two extra bands. One is a shorter wavelength blue band designed for aerosol remote sensing and monitoring coastal water quality. The other is a SWIR band designed for monitoring cirrus clouds.

The TIRS instrument (image 2) has also remained similar to its predecessors on Landsat TM and ETM+. The only upgrade being that now the single thermal band is split in two providing measurements at a spatial resolution of 100m.

Image1: The OLI Instrument:  To help calibrate the system the left hand opening will be aligned with the Earth and the right with the Sun.

Image1: The OLI Instrument:
To help calibrate the system the left hand opening will be aligned with the Earth and the right with the Sun.

 

Image2: Landsat 8 TIRS:   (Thermal Infrared Sensor) Instrument. The second of Landsat 8's two sensors.

Image2: Landsat 8 TIRS:

(Thermal Infrared Sensor) Instrument. The second of Landsat 8’s two sensors.

Image 3:  Landsat 8 at Orbital Science Corp.

Image 3:
Landsat 8 at Orbital Science Corp.

Image 4:  Landsat 8 Imagery is taken at different wavelengths and then combined to give the final image. Different terrain features can be seen based on the combination of the different colour layers.

Image 4:
Landsat 8 Imagery is taken at different wavelengths and then combined to give the final image. Different terrain features can be seen based on the combination of the different colour layers.