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Scantherma R&D 2

Welcome to the second Scantherma R&D post. As mentioned in our last post, we at Scantherma conduct a fair few experiments to help us gain a better understanding of the technologies that we use for our everyday work. In doing this “R&D” we can come up with better techniques that can ultimately save time and enhance the quality of our process and end product.  Here are the second set of images.

Maelstrom1

R&D Image 1 ( Maelstrom 1 )

Maelstrom3

R&D Image 2 ( Maelstrom 2 )

Maelstrom2

R&D image 3 ( Maelstrom 3 )

Freeze_Ray

R&D image 4 ( Freeze Ray )

Ink_blood1

. R&D Image 5 ( Ink & Blood )

vortex1

R&D Image 6 ( Vortex 1 )

vortex2

R&D Image 7 ( Vortex 2 )

The_Blob

R&D Image 8 ( Volcanic Rock )

pumice_lava

R&D Image 9 ( Pumice in Lave )

That’s all  for the second round of R&D images. It is amazing what one can see through a Thermal Camera. The invisible becomes visible. As before try to guess the subject matter of the above images. The Digital photos will be revealed next week so stay tuned.

 

Landsat 5 to be decommissioned

Landsat 5, the only fully-operational Landsat satellite currently in orbit, due to the failure of Landsat 6 to reach orbit and the Scan-Line Corrector failure on Landsat 7 in 2003, is due to be decommissioned after orbiting the planet over 150,000 times and acquiring over 2.5 million images. The satellite was launched in 1984 and was designed to operate for only 3 years. It has significantly exceeded its designed life span and has been in orbit for over 29 years.

landsat-5-satellite

An artist’s impression of the landsat 5 satellite.

Scantherma Thermal Imaging Test Images revealed.

In the previous blog entry we saw a set of very interesting thermal images taken from a series of objects during a Scantherma Thermal Imaging test session that more or less represented astronomical phenomenon. Below are digital images showing those same objects.

The Jam Doughnut in Test image 1 was heated for 30 seconds on high in a microwave. It retained its heat for a while and had a core temperature of more than 110 degrees centigrade. That’s enough to give any hungry doughnut lover a seriously burnt tongue. The thermal image was processed in different IR Palettes to produce the images from the last R&D post.

Mug with hot water (Test Image 2) that was then mixed with a spoon to form a maelstrom effect. The thermal image was then processed to show a very narrow range of the highest temperatures thus displaying the the water in a nice purple and cancelling out the much cooler cup.

Boiling water (Test Image 3) was poured into this bowl followed by flakes of ice. The water surface was very hot and the ice extremely cold thus giving the illusion of the Sun with giant sun spots.   There you have it. Some interesting “trickery” with thermal cameras. Stay tuned for our next R&D blog next week with more interesting images.

 

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1: Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1:
Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2: Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2:
Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3: Bowl of hot water ( Sun )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3:
Bowl of hot water ( Sun )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging Test 1

At Scantherma we conduct a lot of research and development and a lot it concerns Thermal Imaging. Below are a set of very interesting images that were taken during our last session of research.

Have in mind that not everything is as it seems so try to guess what the following thermal images are from.

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 1: Asteroid 1

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 1:
Asteroid 1

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 2: Asteroid 2

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 2:
Asteroid 2

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 3: Moon

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 3:
Moon

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 4: Sun spots

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 4:
Sun spots

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 5: Super Nova

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 5:
Super Nova

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 6: Stellar Gas Cloud

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 6:
Stellar Gas Cloud

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 7: Wormhole

Scantherma Thermal Imaging test Image 7:
Wormhole

 

The true identity of these images will be revealed in our next R&D Blog entry. In the meanwhile have a go at guessing what these Thermal Images are showing.

Thermal Imaging Training Course

Scantherma is pleased to announce the availability of the first in a series of training courses aimed at Thermographers.

This first course titled “ Introduction to Thermography” will cover a range of subject matter that will help you understand the science of Infrared and thermal imaging through to using a thermal camera and taking images.

 

Introduction to Thermography

 

The course duration is approximately 5 hours and will have both theory and practical elements.

Full details will be posted in the coming week. So stay tuned.

 

Landsat 8 Sensors

Landsat 8 launched in February will orbit the Earth fourteen times a day, following the same sequence of ground tracks as Landsat 4, 5 and 7. This allows data to be produced in the same WRS-2 path and row grid system, but collecting 150 more scenes per day than Landsat 7. This greatly increases the possibility of obtaining cloud-free satellite imagery. Although it has been built around a design life of 5 years, it was launched with enough fuel to keep it in orbit and operational for over 10 years. The Landsat satellite has 2 main imaging systems on board. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)  and the Operational Land Imager (OLI).

The failure of the Scan-Line Corrector on Landsat 7 has driven the change from a whiskbroom to a pushbroom sensor for the OLI (image 1)on Landsat8. This brings it into line with most other modern satellite systems. Besides this major design change, the other specifications of the OLI are very similar to the Landsat TM and ETM+ sensors.

Imagery will be collected at a resolution of 30m for multispectral data and 15m for panchromatic data with a swath width of 185km. It will include all spectral bands used by Landsat TM and ETM+ along with two extra bands. One is a shorter wavelength blue band designed for aerosol remote sensing and monitoring coastal water quality. The other is a SWIR band designed for monitoring cirrus clouds.

The TIRS instrument (image 2) has also remained similar to its predecessors on Landsat TM and ETM+. The only upgrade being that now the single thermal band is split in two providing measurements at a spatial resolution of 100m.

Image1: The OLI Instrument:  To help calibrate the system the left hand opening will be aligned with the Earth and the right with the Sun.

Image1: The OLI Instrument:
To help calibrate the system the left hand opening will be aligned with the Earth and the right with the Sun.

 

Image2: Landsat 8 TIRS:   (Thermal Infrared Sensor) Instrument. The second of Landsat 8's two sensors.

Image2: Landsat 8 TIRS:

(Thermal Infrared Sensor) Instrument. The second of Landsat 8’s two sensors.

Image 3:  Landsat 8 at Orbital Science Corp.

Image 3:
Landsat 8 at Orbital Science Corp.

Image 4:  Landsat 8 Imagery is taken at different wavelengths and then combined to give the final image. Different terrain features can be seen based on the combination of the different colour layers.

Image 4:
Landsat 8 Imagery is taken at different wavelengths and then combined to give the final image. Different terrain features can be seen based on the combination of the different colour layers.

First Landsat 8 Images

The first images taken by NASA’s LDCM or Landsat 8 satellite have started coming through.

NASA has also updated their LDCM website with a lot of technical data about the satellite and its mission, including the below quote:

 “But the work is only beginning for validating the data quality and getting ready for normal mission operations. These images were processed using pre-launch settings, which must be checked and adjusted now that LDCM is in orbit to ensure that the data accurately measure the intensity of reflected and emitted light received by the instruments. The mission operations team also needs to ensure that each pixel is accurately located on Earth’s surface. LDCM’s normal operations are scheduled to begin in late May when the instruments have been calibrated and the spacecraft has been fully checked out. At that time, NASA will hand over control of the satellite to the USGS, which will operate the satellite throughout its planned five-year mission life. The satellite will be renamed Landsat 8, and data from OLI and TIRS will be processed and added to the Landsat Data Archive at the Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in South Dakota, where it will be distributed for free over the Internet.”

There’s more information at NASA’s LDCM site:

 http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/index.html

Scantherma_Perth_Landsat8

One of the first images taken by the Landsat Data Continuity Mission satellite. Image courtesy of NASA

Landsat Data Continuity Mission Launched

On February 11th 2013 the Landsat Earth Observation Mission was extended with the launch of the Landsat Continuity Mission on an Atlas V rocket. Once the satellite is in position and operational it will be renamed to Landsat 8. It will be the seventh satellite in the “Landsat” series which started with Landsat 7 (Originally called Earth Resources Technology Satellite)  launched in 1972.

Landsat has made contributions to the scientific community commercial sectors in a range of ways that include agriculture, ecology, water resources, natural hazards, deforestation, spread of disease,  web-mapping and many others.

Aside from all the scientific applications Landsat data has, it has also led to the discovery of  hidden archaeological sites, new lands, features and even species on the Earth’s surface. For example a never before recorded reef was discovered in the Indian Ocean and an island off the coast of Labrador, Canada. In tribute to it’s discoverer, the island was named Landsat island.

Scantherma_AtlasV_Landsat8-liftoff

Atlas V rocket lifting off with the Landsat_Data_Continuity_Mission (Landsat 8) satellite on board.

Landsat 8 satellite sitting inside its protective housing that will be mounted atop the Atlas V rocket.

Landsat 8 satellite sitting inside its protective housing that will be mounted atop the Atlas V rocket.