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Apply for Takor’s Female Summer Internship

We’re thrilled to announce that we’ve teamed up with WiTWA (Women in Technology WA) to create a position for a female intern over the summer.

This is to show our support for women in technology, and to also encourage them to consider a career in the exciting geospatial industry. So if you are or know a woman with a passion for GIS or skills in technology, read on to hear how to apply!

internship

This internship has been created to give one female a hands on experience in a technology company and the opportunity to make valuable contacts. Furthermore, as a geospatial company we would also like to encourage them to consider a career in the rapidly growing GIS industry.

The paid position will commence over the summer for eight weeks full time, or part time if the chosen candidate is still studying. They will work in our Perth office and gain experience by working on either Mappt or Kojai. The tasks given will vary depending on their skills, so they could be doing anything from writing code, web development or graphic design.

To be eligible for the internship, applicants must:

  • Be female
  • Have skills in the technology field
  • Show evidence of interest in a career in the technology industry
  • A passion for GIS/geospatial technology is preferred but not essential

Application Procedure

To apply for the eight week paid postion, please send us your CV plus a covering letter. This covering letter should introduce yourself, outline your skills and have a 300-500 word article describing how you think technology will change the world in the near future, highlighting geospatial technology.

Closing Date

Applications must be sent to before Friday 20th November 2015.

We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Good luck!

Visually Classifying Your Maps by Attributes

Tired of staring at the same, drab, mess of lines and polygons? Having trouble finding the shapes you want? Mappt now has support for Classifications, allowing you to style your features according to the numeric or text values in the layer’s attributes.

Here we have some geological zones. As is typical with datasets, it’s not very pretty to look at. Worse, we can’t really tell much by just glancing at it!

Mmm, red.

Mmm, red.

Looking at the attributes defined in the layer, we can see there is an AREA key defined.

The list of attributes values for one of the zones.

The list of attribute values for one of the zones.

Let’s say we want to easily see the zones with the smallest areas. To do this, we open the layer’s properties, then navigate to the Classifications tab. Here, we can specify how we want to classify the data. In this case, we want to find highlight the features with the smallest AREA attribute value. Let’s do some experimenting!

First, we’ll try to classify the AREA by “Distinct Values”, which will give us a class for every unique AREA value in the layer.

The Classifications screen, showing how to classify an attribute by Distinct Value.

The Classifications screen, showing how to classify by Distinct Value.

When we hit Apply, the classes are generated, and we are taken to the Class Styles tab, which shows the styling applied to each of the determined classes. In the screenshot below, we can see that there were quite a few unique values, so much so that we haven’t really achieved anything by classifying them!  Perhaps Distinct Values wasn’t such a great choice!

There are too many classes to fiddle with.  We can see that classifying a numeric attribute by Distinct Value was a bad idea!

There are too many classes to fiddle with. We can see that classifying a numeric attribute by Distinct Value was a bad idea!

Let’s try again, this time using “Equal Intervals”, which instructs Mappt to classify the features into x number of classes, with x being chosen by us. So, let’s try Equal Intervals.

Let's try that again, this time with Equal Intervals.

Let’s try that again, this time with Equal Intervals.

This will give us 5 nice classes, evenly spread across the range of values found in the AREA attribute of the features in the layer.  We can apply styling to each class, as seen in the screenshot below, where I have used the colour blue to denote the lowest-range class, and yellow for the rest.  Also note that Mappt shows us the range of each class, as well as how many feature are in it, which is handy when fine-tuning your classification parameters.

Geology zones classification equal styles

Highlighting the lower-fifth zones by area in blue.

Closing the layer properties dialog, we can see the styling has been applied to the map. Because of the settings we choose, we have effectively highlighted, in blue, the zones that are in the lower 20% of overall zone sizes.

The smallest fifth of the zones, by area, can now easily be seen!

The smallest fifth of the zones, by area, can now easily be seen!

Using another example, here I have taken a dataset of the world’s volcanoes and classified them by elevation, using Manual Breaks defined at -4000, -2000, 0, 2000 and 4000 feet, allowing me to see which volcanoes are the highest, with increasing blue being below sea level, and increasing red being above sea level.

Blue because water is blue, red because... just because.

Blue because water is blue, red because… just because.

On the map, we can easily see which volcanoes are above or below sea level, as well as how far above or below, simply from their colour.

Aloha!

Aloha!

One last example shows the path of hurricanes in the Atlantic, coloured by wind speed, with redder being faster.

Red always gets such a bad rap in these things.

Red always gets such a bad rap in these things.

So in summary:

Classifications: Mappt, pretty.

Top Three Android tablets for Field use with Mappt.

When using Mappt in the field there are two main requirements.

1: Mappt

2: Awesome Android tablet

Mappt we can provide, but you will have to take care of the Tablet part. This is in fact the harder of the two tasks as there are hundreds of Android tablets to choose from. If you are like most people they will all look pretty similar so in the end it will come down to price. The cost of the device is a major factor in it being selected, but you should take a good close look before you buy. In this article we will try to aid you in this task. To select a tablet not only on it’s looks or price but also by the many other factors such as available accessories, stability, size, weight and most importantly durability for field use.

Tablet 1

Nexus 7 (gen 2)

The Nexus 7 is the third Android tablet in the Nexus line and co-developed by Google and ASUS. It’s a very powerful small form tablet with a lot of accessories.

The New Google / ASUS Nexus 7 gen 2

The New Google / ASUS Nexus 7 gen 2

Tablet 2

Sony Xperia Z

In February 2013 SONY unveiled it’s new tablet the Xperia Tablet Z. A 10 inch tablet that is light, weighing just under half a kilogram and less than 7mm thick.  It’s the worlds thinnest 10 inch tablet not to mention it’s IP55 and IP57 (Ingress Protection) rating making it dust proof, scratch resistant and water proof up to 1 meter for up to 30 minutes.

The Xperia Tablet Z's ports are all well covered and protected against dust and water ingress.

The Xperia Tablet Z’s ports are all well covered and protected against dust and water ingress.

Tablet 3

Panasonic Toughpad FZ-A1

Our final contender is the Panasonic Toughpad FZ-A1. The ultimate field partner. It’s Military spec all weather proof at IP65 and drop proof at 4 feet making it virtually indestructible as far as tablets are concerned. Unfortunately this is also reflected in the price tag.

 

 

All ports are covered and locked away from the elements making this tablet an impregnable bunker.

All ports are covered and locked away from the elements making this tablet an impregnable bunker.

 

Below is a table that compares the three tablets as well as a short review based on Mappt use.

Top three Mappt Field Companion Android Tablets, and why.

Top three Mappt Field Companion Android Tablets, and why.

The Mappt Advantage

 

Nexus 7 gen 2 (4G LTE)

Being the lightest of the three tablets this is in itself a big advantage. Not to mention that it’s fast, powerful and has a highrez display with very good battery life.The price is also very enticing, although you will need to get some very necessary accessories, such as a tough case, matte screen protector, car charger, etc.

Using Mappt on this tablet you are able to conduct all your usual tasks at a very acceptable speed, even with the smaller form factor. This is actually one of its biggest advantages.

An excellent compact Mappt companion that won’t hurt your pocket and fits right in it.

 

Sony Xperia Tablet Z  (4G + WIFI 16gig)

The new Sony Xperia tablet Z has taken the world by storm with its very durable shell, water proof for 30 minutes, dust proof and only 6.9mm thin. A very well rounded tablet with plenty of available accessories, not that you would need any to start off except perhaps a car charger. Perfect as a Mappt companion.

Mappt moves very fast on this device. Information loads lightning fast on the 4G LTE or WIFI. Navigation is a breeze with the clean shatterproof, sensitive, matte screen. Only down side is that it’s a little hard to see the screen in a well sun lit environment. This may be a big issue for some scenarios.

A very well priced and durable tablet. Perfect for almost all you every day Mappt field use.

 

Panasonic Toughpad FZ-A1

If you ignore the huge price tag on this beast then this is hands down the tablet you want with you in the field. Its military spec hardware and case make it literary indestructible (figuratively). You can drop this guy from a height of 2 metres into an ice filled lake and have it sit on the mud lake floor (shallow lake), pick it up moments later and continue working on it.

Mappt works very well on this device even though it runs Android version 4. It has powerful 4G and WIFI connections and a GPS that will never fail. This tablet also comes with a stylus which can help when in the field, so you don’t have to get dirty hands on the screen and have to continuously wipe it.

What it falls short on, which are not vital for Mappt field use, are the cameras and lack of ultra highres display. Also be aware that buying accessories for the Toughpad FZ-A1 will also set you back a bit, as most of the accessories match the higher price of the device.

A tablet for very serious Mappt users who perhaps plan to trek into the caldera of an active volcano.