Scantherma Thermal Imaging Test Images revealed.

In the previous blog entry we saw a set of very interesting thermal images taken from a series of objects during a Scantherma Thermal Imaging test session that more or less represented astronomical phenomenon. Below are digital images showing those same objects.

The Jam Doughnut in Test image 1 was heated for 30 seconds on high in a microwave. It retained its heat for a while and had a core temperature of more than 110 degrees centigrade. That’s enough to give any hungry doughnut lover a seriously burnt tongue. The thermal image was processed in different IR Palettes to produce the images from the last R&D post.

Mug with hot water (Test Image 2) that was then mixed with a spoon to form a maelstrom effect. The thermal image was then processed to show a very narrow range of the highest temperatures thus displaying the the water in a nice purple and cancelling out the much cooler cup.

Boiling water (Test Image 3) was poured into this bowl followed by flakes of ice. The water surface was very hot and the ice extremely cold thus giving the illusion of the Sun with giant sun spots.   There you have it. Some interesting “trickery” with thermal cameras. Stay tuned for our next R&D blog next week with more interesting images.

 

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1: Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 1:
Jam_Doughnut ( Asteroids, Moon, Nebula, Nova )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2: Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 2:
Hot_Water_Mug ( Wormhole )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3: Bowl of hot water ( Sun )

Scantherma Thermal Imaging: Test image 3:
Bowl of hot water ( Sun )